China, India, Japan and the Security of Southeast Asia

About the Publication

This volume presents the findings of a research project organized by the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies in 1989 to look specifically into the impact of the end of the Cold War on regional security. It is one of the few attempts that have been made to understand the complex nature of relations between the major Asian powers and Southeast Asia in the context of their historical ambitions and current strategic imperatives. The eleven contributors are a unique combination of regional and international expertise in the field of strategic analysis representing all the major interested parties in the wider Asia-Pacific environment. Their chapters deal not only with China, India, and Japan but also with the central role of ASEAN, particularly its largest member, Indonesia, and the rapidly changing profile of Vietnam.
          
          
          
          

Contents

Preliminary Pages
Part I: EMERGING ASIAN POWERS
1. Regional Perceptions of China and Japan
2. The Classical Conductor and the Jazz Band: Chinese Foreign Policy towards Asia in the 1990s
3. India's Security Policy: Desire and Necessity in a Changing World
4. Japan in Post-Cold War Asia
5. Japan's Policy Towards Southeast Asia: Anatomy of "Autonomous Diplomacy" and the American Factor
Part II: THE ASEAN DIMENSION
6. India-ASEAN Relations: Evolution, Growth, and Prospects
7. Major Concerns in China's ASEAN Policy
8. ASEAN and the South China Sea Problem
Part III: REGIONAL PERSPECTIVES
9. Changes and Continuity in Indonesia's Regional Outlook
10. Vietnam in Post-Cold War Asia: A Cautious Hand at the Wheel
EPILOGUE: The Southeast Asian Experience of Regional Order: Past and Future Trends
The Contributors, Index

Similar Publications